How Old Were The Gossip Girl Characters In Season 1 Great Fiction: Get Down by Asali Solomon

You are searching about How Old Were The Gossip Girl Characters In Season 1, today we will share with you article about How Old Were The Gossip Girl Characters In Season 1 was compiled and edited by our team from many sources on the internet. Hope this article on the topic How Old Were The Gossip Girl Characters In Season 1 is useful to you.

Great Fiction: Get Down by Asali Solomon

Asali Solomon’s Get Down (2006)

Have you ever heard a song Me and Mrs. Jones by Billy Paul? What do you think the lyrics are about? Put that question aside for a few minutes while we consider a few stories in Asali Solomon’s first collection To the ground. By the way, if I tell you that this collection is about groups of African-American and Hispanic teenagers and young adults in Philadelphia, you’ll probably think that the title is as in “Do a little dance, make a little love, get down tonight,” right? If so, you’re only partially right. One of the central concerns of this book is language itself, and how it can often be malleable, malleable, malleable, taking on forms and meanings that surprise us. Words here are not just vehicles of expression, but wonders, objects fascination; sentences, wonderful carriers of emotions and thoughts that are not so easy for characters to put into communicative speech. (Which is a possible explanation for why everyone seems to be so interested in music.)

There are seven stories in the volume. For reasons of economy, I’ll only focus on two here, and for one, I’ll focus on something that, while not central to the story, is something that I personally find fascinating. These two stories conclude the volume; of course, the other five are equally interesting. (“Star of the Story” perhaps operates on a different level of sophistication and observation than some of the others. I heard Solomon read from this great story at the KGB bar in New York). All seven share some elements, naturally. The first, “Save Me”, is experimental.

“Twelve Takes Thea” and “First Summer” have unexpected endings (the latter moves on the last page into a kind of reflective metafiction not seen anywhere else in the volume; there, Solomon inserts herself into the story as narrator and speaks directly to the reader), but not that kind of surprise, shocking twists in thrillers; instead, these endings are revelations. The events contribute to the emotional education of the characters and make us, the readers, think about possible similar events in our lives. The the ongoing process of acquiring adulthood is a sentence that comes to mind. A seventh-grade girl has her first experience with deliberate, calculated lying meant to be malicious, and is baffled to discover that the same ability exists within herself; a young man is stunned to learn many years after high school that a girl in his high school class had a crush on him all those years ago.

Thea is a sixth grader. When her best friend Nadja transfers to another school at the end of the year, it seems like the end of the world, although her new school is not that far away and they still see each other and talk on the phone often. Seventh grade begins with several new girls, among them Frances Dyson and Beth Johannssen, whose name is a curiosity and a mystery because she is apparently of Indian origin. Frances replaces the late Nadja as the other black woman in the group, although, Thea thinks, she looks ghetto (Thea’s word) and Thea isn’t sure what to make of her. Reverse: Thea’s parents try to force a friendship between Thea and Frances:

“Eventually the Black Barrett (BBP) parents got together and if my parents went to the first meeting, or tea as it was sometimes called, and met Frances’ parents, and if there was any indication that I was I would be very wish I hadn’t carried her on my back, saved her seats, or shown her how to flush the antique high school toilets.”

It’s a given that racial identity is a big concern in Thea’s life—though at her age it seems an open question to what extent she can effectively deal with self-perception in this way—and that’s definitively established in the first fifteen pages:

– Thea’s brother Stephen mockingly calls her “Jane” as a kind of derogatory name for white girls;

– the teacher at school cannot tell Thea and Nadja apart;

– Thea takes the bus from the city of Philly, where she lives, to Bryn Mawr, where the school is, every day, prompting a classmate to remark, “I hear there are pools of blood on every corner in Philly” – meaning the whole city. is a violent black slum;

– Nadja’s new school is a school where the nuns still hand out corporal punishment to the children – Thea notes, “Your parents would never let you go where white people could beat you.”;

– as Nadja is about to leave, Stephen says, “Now you’re really going to want to.” I do not.

– upon first seeing Frances Thea thinks “Frances was black. I knew my parents would be very excited about that.”

– when Nadja and Thea are chatting on the phone about Beth Johanssen, Nadja remarks, “I guess she thinks she’s white.”

– Thea and Beth have a little game where they pretend everyone at school looks like an animal;

when Beth identifies Frances as an ape, Thea wants to protest this cruel racism, but won’t for fear of damaging her own relationship with ‘cool’ Beth.

This leads to the second main theme of the story, which has to do with peer pressure, acceptance, being part of the crowd, etc. – things that are so desperately important to kids this age. The magnitude of Thea’s adolescence is perhaps best symbolized by the incredulous awe she displays when she learns that Frances has a boyfriend. Then when Frances calls her Oreo, she’s stung, but seems to have conveniently forgotten her earlier characterization of Frances as too ghetto. But the real point has to do with the web of relationships Thea has with several girls – Nadja, Frances, Beth and a girl who is only marginally introduced as one of the most popular at Barrett, Liza.

Thea truly worships Beth Johanssen to the point where she starts copying her habits, like her wrinkled nose or the way Beth dances (“I tried to do what she did.”) She whines at Nadja every time she speaks, her inability to deal with it. The latter’s transfer to another school simply consumed her emotions (“You never want to go anywhere with me.”) Eventually, Beth, Nadja, Liza, and Frances all bond with Thea in surprising ways through a series of impossible lies. Anticipate. But it turns out that Solomon has thoroughly set us up for the target in a sort of under-the-radar way (“By the way, Nadja was the only Barrett girl my brother didn’t call.” I do not” and “A lot of people hated me there,” she (Beth) told me over lunch once.) The portrayal of manners, etiquette, and ritual behavior at a school dance is also interesting.

One of the truly remarkable things Solomon is able to do here is transport us back to elementary school with such precision that it hurts—it’s almost painful to remember what we thought was important back then. Thea says of Beth Johanssen, “Even though she was wearing a different brand of sneakers, she was clearly the prettiest girl in the class.” And although Nadja went to another school and did not meet Beth, at the end of the story Beth penetrated Nadja’s circle of communication. Somehow, in a small degree of separation and the results are disturbing to Thea. A sensitivity to the language, and thus to the objects and concepts in the world it refers to, allows us to glimpse into Thea’s very soul—the italicized form sadistic, psoriasis, and Eastern hell they flow through her consciousness with ease once she understands their meanings as spoken by others. (This reappears in “Party On Vorhees!”, in which the character Sarah awakens her hypersensitivity by speaking nonsense such as “Around the way.”) Lines that express familiar teenage thoughts and behaviors such as “I decided to wait out the slow songs in bathrooms” (during the dance – Thea has this idea because none of the boys ask her to the dance and she’s embarrassed) they get the whole mood so right that it both hurts and pleases them at the same time. We discover that the author, from an adult’s point of view, can objectively twist the narrative, which the characters themselves would not be able to understand.

In “First Summer” race is a more obtuse issue than in “Twelve Takes Thea.” Delayna works the register at a clothing store called Urbanicide, prompting Rufus to remark, “I didn’t know they let black people near the money there. Part of Delayna’s response to this is, “Basically, my job is to make sure black people don’t steal.” The racism and racist policies discussed here don’t need to be fine-tuned, edited or danced around like in the previous story – and that’s partly because the characters are more mature here, although school days do play a role. once again.

Summary: Rufus lives with his girlfriend Shanna and their newborn son at Shanna’s mother Alba’s house. One morning, while waiting for the bus on his way to work, he meets Delayna, who knows him from high school. At first he doesn’t say anything about it, waiting to see if he recognizes her, but he doesn’t. It is only later, after they meet at the movie and go to her place, that the exact degree of her interest in him becomes fully apparent:

She says, “You can’t go yet. I’m not done telling you my stupid problems. You know, I couldn’t do all this in high school when you were with the cheerleaders and went to the basement party every night.” .”

When Delayna reveals a surprising secret to Rufus and he suggests they take sick days from work to work on it together, she has mixed feelings about betraying her family.

Now this story has enough texture to support a study as long as the story itself, but I’d like to highlight something that jumped out at me as I read, something that must be very difficult to do in short fiction because we don’t have much I don’t see . I’m talking about minor characters who are so strong that they have an immense impact on the story, even though they only appear briefly, and they stick in the reader’s mind with exceptional vividness. If you wanted clear examples from another medium, movies, think of Mickey Rourke Body heat or Brad Pitt Thelma and Louise – short but monstrous impact. Here, the character of Tony, Rufus’ friend, works in this way.

Tony was a classmate of Rufus and Shanna’s in high school where, we’re told, he skipped class so often that the other students gave the cut-out a name – “hanging with Tony.” Naming this universal student ritual after yourself is probably the best way to bestow status. But Tony is an enigma. Despite being a champion cutter and header, “he’s been employee of the month in their department so many times that Rufus has lost track.” Not only is he a star at work, but when Shanna agitates Rufus, the first thing Rufus thinks about is how Tony handled (or didn’t handle) a similar situation with his own girlfriend – his behavior is a standard to be compared to. When Rufus meets Delayna and has to make up a lie to cover himself, he says he’ll have a drink with “Tone and them”; Shanna later used this exact expression, “Tone and them” – who are “they”? They never told us, they were never identified, and apparently they don’t need to be. It’s not “Bill and them” or “James and them”. And Tony is the only one Rufus talks to about Delayna. Even if he can’t bring himself to reveal the truth, Tony knows it anyway – “Rufus, man, all it takes is one wrong move.”

In her book Principles of literature Christina Myers-Shaffer lists seven methods of characterization: stereotyping; exposure; character actions; character words; the character’s thoughts; the words of others; and using settings. Tony shows us all seven of these methods in this story – a remarkable feat! in The art of fiction David Lodge writes that “character is probably the most important component of the novel”. Although they are stories, the idea is the same, and this story in particular is a fantastic illustration of the claim.

Sometimes the best way to appreciate an achievement in art is to feel that truth is extracted from your own memories and experiences, almost like pulling a tooth, and brought to light as a prevailing ecumenical matter. That’s what’s happening here. I can tell you that I haven’t thought about episodes from my high school years in decades, but these stories made me think, made me think—and made me smile, nod, wince, and almost cry a few times. process.

Video about How Old Were The Gossip Girl Characters In Season 1

You can see more content about How Old Were The Gossip Girl Characters In Season 1 on our youtube channel: Click Here

Question about How Old Were The Gossip Girl Characters In Season 1

If you have any questions about How Old Were The Gossip Girl Characters In Season 1, please let us know, all your questions or suggestions will help us improve in the following articles!

The article How Old Were The Gossip Girl Characters In Season 1 was compiled by me and my team from many sources. If you find the article How Old Were The Gossip Girl Characters In Season 1 helpful to you, please support the team Like or Share!

Rate Articles How Old Were The Gossip Girl Characters In Season 1

Rate: 4-5 stars
Ratings: 6335
Views: 17639964

Search keywords How Old Were The Gossip Girl Characters In Season 1

How Old Were The Gossip Girl Characters In Season 1
way How Old Were The Gossip Girl Characters In Season 1
tutorial How Old Were The Gossip Girl Characters In Season 1
How Old Were The Gossip Girl Characters In Season 1 free
#Great #Fiction #Asali #Solomon

Source: https://ezinearticles.com/?Great-Fiction:-Get-Down-by-Asali-Solomon&id=9900566

Related Posts

default-image-feature

Fun Things To Do With A 4 Year Old Girl Top Six Fun Things To Do in Lincoln City Oregon

You are searching about Fun Things To Do With A 4 Year Old Girl, today we will share with you article about Fun Things To Do With…

default-image-feature

My 6 Year Old Said She Wants To Kill Herself Mandisa Living Out Her Faith on Idol

You are searching about My 6 Year Old Said She Wants To Kill Herself, today we will share with you article about My 6 Year Old Said…

default-image-feature

My 6 Year Old Never Wants To Leave The House Art Collecting Tips for Profit and Pleasure (A Six-Part Series): Part 6 – Leaving a Legacy of Art

You are searching about My 6 Year Old Never Wants To Leave The House, today we will share with you article about My 6 Year Old Never…

default-image-feature

How Old Were The Golden Girls When The Show Ran Running – Gig Harbor and Northwest Christian Win Big at 2007 Washington State Championships

You are searching about How Old Were The Golden Girls When The Show Ran, today we will share with you article about How Old Were The Golden…

default-image-feature

How Old Were The Golden Girls When The Show Ended How to Organize a Halloween Party Celebrating Walt Disney Princesses

You are searching about How Old Were The Golden Girls When The Show Ended, today we will share with you article about How Old Were The Golden…

default-image-feature

My 6 Year Old Keeps Saying Her Mouth Feels Funny 151 Minutes to More Money, Wealth, Health, Success and Relationships

You are searching about My 6 Year Old Keeps Saying Her Mouth Feels Funny, today we will share with you article about My 6 Year Old Keeps…