Gifts For A 2 Year Old Girl For Under 25 Risk In Teenagers – Why Do They Take Work, Driving And Life Risks? Explanations Here

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Risk In Teenagers – Why Do They Take Work, Driving And Life Risks? Explanations Here

TO RETAIN Generation Y, employers need to ensure their safety and health at work, as well as work-life balance and fun. This is a snapshot of how the current young generation generally thinks. This stems from Generation Y’s negative observations of how their baby boomers and Generation X’s parents suffered from job insecurity, layoffs, stress and high levels of job dissatisfaction.

Adolescence is undoubtedly the most difficult time in life. Getting used to becoming an adult is usually a painful transition. Have you ever wondered why teenagers think and act the way they do? For example, why do they have such a tendency to take risks. Some recent research reveals that there are tangible, scientific reasons for this. Some of these questions are being answered in the field of psychology, focusing on brain development during this part of the life span.

The purpose of this article is to expose and demystify the issues of adolescent brain development so that adult members of society (and parents) can at least understand and address these issues, giving young people the respect and dignity they deserve and making the transition. in adulthood as pain-free as possible. The following short article summarizes a series of points culled from 2006’s research-backed Psychological Science.Source: Glendon, pp. 137–150. p. with full reference information at the end.)

Notes and conclusions

Adolescents are generally better suited to working late night shifts than adults, but they are not as well suited to hazardous occupations where risk avoidance is important, as they may try to “justify” the risk and the hazard may inadvertently “bite” them. in process. Teenagers don’t have a “higher way” of thinking, so why do we expect them to think and analyze details well? They simply do not perceive and manage risks well. Careful, mature and sensitive supervision is essential.

Teens are often frustrated when they have to make decisions based on chance or risk, and tend to do “things” anyway. Adolescents need quality, careful supervision and mentoring for specialized tasks. If this is not achieved, they will have accidents and injuries.

Hormonal changes cause most brain development problems and must be managed even in the mid-twenties. Gender differences are pronounced – girls are 4-6 years ahead of boys until their late 20s. This fact creates countless relationship problems between the sexes.

Novelty-seeking, sensation-seeking, and risk-taking in teenagers can be explained by the way the brain develops—it’s not just a matter of personal choice.

When it comes to driving, it’s important to discourage young drivers from driving with more than one or two peers at a time. With each In addition a teenage passenger has an increased risk of a crash. The risk of cornering collisions is higher for young male drivers than for all other age and gender groups. Parents are critical role models for their teenagers regarding driving behavior, especially same-sex parents. If the father misbehaves on the road, the teenager is likely to repeat it. The same goes for mothers and daughters.

In a work context, we should not give teenagers more than one thing at a time; most have complex work routines and procedures designed to fail. More mature workers tend to set the tone for workplace culture, and teenagers often simply fit into that culture. No matter how good the safety systems are, if the culture allows teenagers to take risks, they will want to take them

It’s easy to think of young people as “careless and uncaring”, the truth is that there is not much they can do about how they are “wired” and where they are on the developmental curve. The fact that they cannot use effective thinking and decision-making in relation to risk as well as adults must be sensitively addressed, since most adolescents are inherently independent; they want to be treated like adults. As adults, we need to do our best to keep them safe during the gap years, while respecting them in ways that show their growing capacity to relate as adults.

© Steve J. Wickham, 2008. All rights reserved worldwide.

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Bullets of (reference) aggregated actual data:

  • Once youth have engaged in one risk-taking behavior, other risk-taking behaviors are likely to follow.
  • There are three levels of brain development. 1) corpus striatum or the “reptilian brain” responsible for routine and instinct (movement); it develops earlier. 2) limbic brain is the “seat of emotions” (feeling) and develops further. 3) Neocortex or crust– which makes up 80 percent of the brain’s volume, is the last to mature and is involved in (thought) reasoning and complex “higher way” thinking. For this reason McLean (1949) proposed three “streams” of brain development – movement, sensation and thought.[1]
  • The cortex is an “executive filter” that assists the lower centers and is used to determine the response.
  • “The circuits of the limbic system are relatively fixed and can strongly influence our (thought) cognitions.” (Glendon, 2006, p. 139).
  • A longer (but preferred) way of cognition is through the “higher way” or the cortex. It is related to a more detailed, factual analysis of things, events and situations.
  • The cerebellum (responsible for posture and movement) is the oldest part of the brain and continues to grow into late adolescence.[2]
  • Young male drivers (17-19 years old) have a significantly higher risk of crashing negotiating a bend than 30-39-year-old men and women of the same age.
  • The hippocampus there are connections with both limbic structures, and the neocortex has an essential “role in integrating emotions with cognition” – feeling and thought. (Glendon, 2006, p. 139).
  • Adolescents have a higher melatonin peak during the day compared to children and adults, which could explain why they prefer to go to bed later and wake up later. This means that teenagers and young adults are likely to cope better with shift work in general than adults.
  • Because right ventral striatum is less active during adolescence, adolescents are more prone to risky behavior due to suppression of reward seeking rather than potential motivator ie reward for safety.
  • Adolescents are more dissatisfied with the decision-making task of gambling (“probability matching”) than children and adults because dorsolateral prefrontal cortex not fully matured until mid-20s.
  • Young people might “see” as well as adults, but they cannot perceive risks as well because they have yet to develop higher-level (cortical) cognitive interpretation functions.
  • Young people seem to engage in “elaborate reasoning” in risky situations, which paradoxically is not good because this is when instincts need to come into play. Adults “rather create a mental image of what is possible [injurious] (Glendon, 2006, p. 141). In addition, the extended rationale results in a longer response time when a visceral response (gut response) would suffice.
  • The brain changes dramatically anatomically between the ages of 18 and 25, partly explaining why insurance companies have “up to 25 clauses.”
  • Gender differences in brain development are pronounced. “Girls’ brains develop faster than boys’…the typical brain of a 17-year-old boy resembles the brain of an 11-year-old girl.” (Glendon, 2006, p. 142). Using another measure: brain myelination, the gender difference is 3-4 years in favor of women. By this measure, men’s brain development does not “catch up” with women’s until age 29.
  • Although several cross-sectional studies have been conducted, there have been very few longitudinal studies[3] and it needs to be addressed.
  • Full brain maturity occurs in the mid to late twenties for both sexes; meanwhile, “brain-driven hormonal changes” and the behavioral safety issues associated with this need must be managed. (Glendon, 2006, p. 142).
  • “Brain systems that control arousal, emotional experience and social information processing become more active during puberty.” This explains why we see teenagers “increased in novelty, sensation-seeking and risk-taking”. (Glendon, 2006, pp. 143-44).
  • Traffic accident data shows that the risk of a crash increases when “every additional member of the peer group is a passenger.” (Glendon, 2006, p. 144). This means that parents should try to set limits for their teenagers who ride with one or two peers in the car. Maybe four or five teenagers in one car is asking for trouble?
  • Peer pressure remains a significant problem for people up to about age 25 due to the immaturity of the frontal lobes.
  • Multitasking functions are not perfected until adulthood. Young drivers who use mobile phones, CD players etc. while driving are even more prone to accidents than adults. Teens should only be given one task at a time until they show they can handle more.
  • “Preventing exposure” is likely the best way to protect young people, workers and drivers. (Glendon, 2006, p. 144). In other words, a strong focus should be placed on protecting and ensuring the safety of young people in dangerous environments such as on the roads. Supervisory control is appropriate and desirable.
  • Parents are critical role models for their teenagers regarding driving behavior, especially same-sex parents. If the father misbehaves on the road, the teenager is likely to repeat it.
  • In a work context, more mature employees set the tone for workplace culture, and teenagers often simply fit into that culture. No matter how good the safety systems are, if the culture allows teenagers to take risks, they will take them.
  • Main reference:

    Glendon, I., Brain development during adolescence: some implications for risk-taking and injury liability, in Journal of Occupational Health and Safety: Australia and New Zealand2006, 22(2): 137-150.

    Footnotes:

    [1] Jones, Joseph M. (1995) Affect as a process: Exploring the centrality of affect in psychological life (Contributed by Joseph D. Lichtenberg, 268 pages, The Analytic Press, Hillsdale, NJ and London) pp. 62-63. p.

    [2] Goodburn, Elizabeth A. and Ross, David A. (1995). “The Picture of Health: A Review and Annotated Bibliography of Youth Health in Developing Countries.” Published by the World Health Organization and UNICEF. The World Health Organization quantifies “adolescence” from age 10-19 years.

    [3] Longitudinal studies typically involve following a cohort group for 20–30 years and are obviously less common in the research community compared to cross-sectional studies because of the difficulty of following the same group of individuals over such a long period of time.

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